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Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 1, 2010 10:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

Don't know the specifics, but as I have bored you with before, and Bill (UU) will support, many locals picked MG as THE band of the early SF sound...my brothers, again, put them at the top.

I liked/like their sound, but it is rather narrow, with little real experimentation, blah, blah, blah...?

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Sep 1, 2010 10:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

yeah I've never been able to hear what makes them more special. I'd like to check out that live one someone posted a link to awhile back

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Poster: TOOTMO Date: Sep 1, 2010 10:56am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

http://tela.sugarmegs.org/_asxtela/asxcards/MobyGrape1965-69LiveDarkMagic.html

This is a collection of live tracks and it has a ton of "liner notes"-type info.

TOOTMO

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Poster: user unknown Date: Sep 1, 2010 6:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

As the Prime Minister said, Moby Grape was considered THE BAND in the early days of the San Francisco music scene. They were the most polished, professional and probably the most talented of a very large group of musicians living in the Bay area. Unfortunately they were plagued with ego-trips, mental problems, and shady management which led to a quick implosion. The "flash in the pan" history, coupled with failed efforts, by band members and managers, to resurrect the faded glory has left them as a mostly overlooked remnant of The San Francisco Scene.

The eponymous first album is a "must have" for anyone delving into Moby Grape. Ten of thirteen tunes were released as singles. "In 2003, the album was ranked number 121 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time., ahead of Jefferson Airplane's Surrealistic Pillow (146), The Byrds' Greatest Hits (178), Buffalo Springfield Again (188), Grateful Dead's Live Dead (244), Big Brother and the Holding Company's Cheap Thrills (338), and The Doors' albums L.A. Woman (362) and Strange Days (407)."

"WOW" is a strong follow up, though it shows minor signs of "sophomore slump". It is more "polished" and heavily arranged.

"Grape Jam" was much looser and improvisational. Michael Bloomfield and Al Kooer were involved in the studio sessions that became "Grape Jam". It is actually the first rock recording utilizing the "super group" ideology that lead to the "Bloomfield-Kooper-Stills Super Session"

"Vintage: The Very Best of Moby Grape", originally released in 1993, is a good retrospective of the band's studio output.

And thanks for the link to "Dark Magic". I am "grabbing" it now.



This post was modified by user unknown on 2010-09-02 01:52:16

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Sep 1, 2010 10:31am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

How does Quicksilver fit into that equation? I really love some of their live stuff that I've heard from the earlier era.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Sep 1, 2010 12:50pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

yeah QMS has some killer stuff, the vocals kind of ruin it for me too. But to hear Chip and Duncan tear it up is pretty intense. I wish there was more live circa 68 Airplane too. Same setlists but to hear Jorma and Jack dominant the band like that is pretty right on imo. Leave the vocals on the album and listen to them just run that band.

James Gurley is way under rated too. Don't know how to play so don;t really know if he was any good but he sure pounded the shit out of that thing while most everyone else has that cute thin 60/s sound. Him and Chip

To me several of the bands were more brutal than what the Dead were doing but then they imploded, exploded, and burned out whereas slow and steady won the race I guess huh?

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Sep 1, 2010 12:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

Did you know this?

JEFFERSON AIRPLANE TAKES OFF

Jefferson Airplane
The argument rages on, but for many music fans in the ’60s, the best live band from the Bay Area was Jefferson Airplane. The Airplane featured three master instrumentalists (Jorma Kaukonen, Jack Casady and Spencer Dryden) and three vocalists: Grace Slick (replacing original singer Signe Anderson in 1966), Marty Balin and Paul Kantner. The Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame inductees made a total of eight studio albums and released a smattering of live albums including 1969’s Bless Its Pointed Little Head.

But what most fans don’t know is that there are vast reserves of never-released live material by Jefferson Airplane capturing key moments in their history. On October 26, 2010, Collectors’ Choice Music Live will release four previously unreleased live albums: Live at the Fillmore Auditorium 10/15/66 Late Show — Signe’s Farewell, Live at the Fillmore Auditorium 10/16/66 Early & Late Shows — Grace’s Debut, Live at the Fillmore Auditorium 11/25/66 & 11/27/66 — We Have Ignition, and Return to the Matrix 2/1/68.

Taken together, the four releases confirm that at its best, when Jorma was soaring, Jack rumbling and the three voices joining in ecstatic melisma, no other band could ascend to the heights attained by the Airplane. Hand-picked by a team of devotees and featuring rare photos inside handsome digi-packs, these concerts distill and express the dream and promise of the Haight-Ashbury scene.
http://www.jambase.com/articles/story.aspx?storyID=23695

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Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 1, 2010 2:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

One brother always said he liked the orig gal better than Grace...I've only heard a little of it, and don't see (er, "hear") it, but perhaps live? He saw them in 66, I think, with her, and then never liked "the replacement"...

I think J hit the nail on the head; MG went south fast; QMS had lots of personel changes, and then went south; JA peaked a little after MG & QMS, I think, but also really blew themselves up...By 1970, with the two albums, again, my bros and friends were willing to say "ah, now the DEAD are finally the best band in the area..." or some such. They did give them a lot of credit for sticking with it, if you will. Not sure that counts for too much, but defn counts for something, eh?

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Sep 1, 2010 1:50pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

no I didn't thanks! I have some 66 and some 67 and there's some good stuff but they were still kind of doing the folksy thing. I'm interested more in late 67 and 68, 69. the ferocious stuff like Bless its pointed little head where Jack just stomps the hell over everybody's head. That 68 one is just the ticket. I think I have that one if it's the Matrix one BUT the pitch is clearly fast so it's a joke to listen to. Killer setlist though. Thanks for the link

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Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 1, 2010 11:49am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Sam Cutler (former manager) talks of differences between Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead

Oh, right with them; they used to say "MG is THE band, and QMS is much better at what YOU think you like, kid!" (ie, the jams by the DEAD I would suggest were unique; they'd come back with HTrails-esque stuff).

Speaking of JB (weren't we? har), I have always had a place in my heart for "top five bass lines/solos" and it's from the intro, first ten minutes or so of the whole Who do you Love biz off HTrails, that just really grabs you I always thought...almost as good as SOYLove...